Home Household machines We reveal how switching to energy-efficient household items could save you hundreds of dollars a year

We reveal how switching to energy-efficient household items could save you hundreds of dollars a year

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As the cost of energy rises and we become more aware of our carbon footprint, many savvy households are looking for ways to reduce their consumption.

One way to ensure you’re paying less in the long run – and helping the environment at the same time – is to upgrade to more energy-efficient appliances.

Households could save, say, £113 a year – simply by switching to a more efficient fridge-freezer.

Technology has improved by leaps and bounds in recent years with a focus on making devices more environmentally friendly.

Switching to a more energy-efficient device could save you hundreds of dollars a year

All household appliances available on the market must have an energy efficiency certificate.

The certificates will rate a device from A+++ to D – A+++ being the most energy efficient and D being the least.

An A to G scale was in use from 1995, before the current certificates were introduced in 2010. However, appliance manufacturers are currently in the process of reverting to the A to G scale.

Before these certificates were put in place – and even for a while afterwards – many appliances were not very energy efficient and cost a lot more to operate each year.

But how much could switching to an A+++ rated device actually save you each year?

This is Money has calculated the numbers to find out exactly how long it would take you to make up the amount spent on a less energy-efficient device when switching to a more energy-efficient one.

By subtracting the typical annual cost of the least energy-efficient device from the cost of the most energy-efficient device, then dividing that cost by the cost of an average device, we calculated how many years/months it would take to offset the cost of buying a more energy-efficient device.

We have found that some of the biggest savings can be made when changing fridge-freezers.

A C-rated fridge-freezer costs an average of £151 per year, while the typical annual cost of an A+++-rated fridge-freezer is just £38, a difference of £113.

COST OF APPLIANCES BY ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Device Cost per year per energy rating for typical use
Energetic efficiency
rating
A+++ A++ A+ A B VS D
Washing machine £28 £32 £37 £42 £48 £54 £62
Dishwasher £39 £45 £51 £58 £66 £75 £86
Fridge £13 £17 £23 £36 £39 £43
Fridge £38 £50 £63 £76 £114 £151
Based on a unit tariff of 0.19 pence per kWh
Source: Local Energy

The typical price of an A+++ rated fridge-freezer on AO.com is £649, meaning it would take five and a half years to offset the cost of buying a new appliance through lower running costs students.

Switching to a more energy-efficient fridge-freezer will not only save you money, it will also reduce your energy consumption by three quarters.

A class C device uses 816 kWh per year, while an A+++ typically only uses 206.

Savings can also be made by switching to a more energy-efficient dishwasher. A typical dishwasher on AO.com, which has an A+++ rating, costs £429.

Money Savings: Could switching fridge-freezers save you money in the long run?

Money Savings: Could switching fridge-freezers save you money in the long run?

Using a D rated dishwasher costs an average of £86 per year for typical use, while an A+++ rated dishwasher has an average typical use of £39.

That’s a difference of £47 per year. In nine years, you’ll offset the cost of buying a new A+++ rated dishwasher – while helping the environment at the same time.

Upgrading to an A+++ dishwasher will also halve your energy consumption from 462 kWh per year to just 208.

A typical new A++++ rated washing machine costs around £299. The annual cost of running a D rated washing machine is £62 a year, while an A+++ rated machine only uses £28, a difference of £34.

KWH USED BY APPLIANCES EACH YEAR BY ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Device kWh/year per energy rating for typical use
Energetic efficiency
rating
A+++ A++ A+ A B VS D
Washing machine 150 174 197 227 257 291 334
Dishwasher 208 240 273 314 356 402 462
Fridge 72 90 122 192 212 232
Fridge 206 270 339 408 612 816
Based on a unit rate of 0.19 pence per kWh
Source: Local Energy

Upgrading to a new A+++ rated machine means you could offset the cost of using an old device in eight years and seven months.

In the long run, it’s not a huge amount of time and could save you hundreds of pounds in the future.

It will also reduce your energy consumption by more than half – from an average consumption of 334 kWh per year to just 150.

A typical fridge, with an A++ rating, costs £149 on AO.com with an average usage of £17 per year.

This is compared to £43 per year for a C-rated device, a difference of £26.

This means that it would take just over five and a half years before the cost of a new refrigerator was fully reimbursed.

You’ll also save over three times the energy – down from 232 kWh per year to just 72 – a huge difference.

On AO’s website, the only appliances available are with an A rating or higher, which the company said it implemented after realizing energy efficiency had become more important to its customers.

This is something that a number of other electric companies have also decided to take into account, although it is not legally required.

How much you could save per year by changing household appliances

If you live in a house full of old, inefficient appliances, you could save money in the long run by replacing them with newer, more energy-efficient models.

Upgrading from a D rated washing machine to an A+++ rated washing machine could save you £34 a year on your typical annual energy bill.

Upgrading from a D rated dishwasher to an A+++ rated dishwasher could also save you £47 a year.

Upgrading to an A+++ rated fridge freezer from a C rated fridge could save you £113 a year, while upgrading from a C rated fridge to an A++ rated fridge could save you £26 a year.

In total, if you change all these appliances, you could save up to £220 on your energy bills.

You would also save 1208 kWh of energy per year – which would make a substantial difference to the environment – as well as your savings.

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