Home Household machines 12 of the Best Home Uses for Hair Conditioner

12 of the Best Home Uses for Hair Conditioner

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Photo: Maryna Pleshkun (Shutterstock)

Hair conditioner is not a particularly complex thing. Its name says what it does: it conditions your hair. You use it in the shower to offset the drying effect of your shampoo and make your hair easier to comb. It’s simple, isn’t it? It’s not this simple, in fact. You can do a lot with conditioner besides moisturizing your hair. Here are some unexpected uses for the bath time necessity.

Get the perfect shave

Photo: Dr. Pixel (Shutterstock)

Photo: Dr. Pixel (Shutterstock)

This trick has been around for a while, and if you’ve ever forgotten shaving gel on vacation, you might know it: conditioner is great for shaving. It coats the hair well and helps you get a close and smooth shave. Use it like any standard shaving product or instead of a foaming soap.

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Shrink a shirt

Photo: Stock-Asso (Shutterstock)

Photo: Stock-Asso (Shutterstock)

A shrunken garment is a bummer, but it’s not necessarily a reason to throw away your shirt. Try using the conditioner to resize it instead. Fill a sink with warm water, add a squirt of white conditioner, and let the shrunken piece soak for at least five minutes. When you take it out of the water, lay it flat to dry and return it to its original size.

Soften itchy tissue

Photo: sruilk (Shutterstock)

Photo: sruilk (Shutterstock)

Conditioner will not only help you resize your shirts, it will also make them tolerable to wear. You can use it to soften itchy wool. Immerse your rough garment in cold water, then press it to squeeze out the water. Apply the conditioner and work it into the fabric. Leave it alone for about 30 minutes, rinse the wool and dry it flat. Now you can finally wear that terrible scarf you’ve always hated.

Give your underwear an at-home dry cleaning

Photo: Angyee Patipat (Shutterstock)

Photo: Angyee Patipat (Shutterstock)

Your delicates can also be conditioned, according to Buzzfeed. Add a tablespoon of conditioner to a sink filled with room-temperature water, soak the underwear or fancy clothes for a few minutes, rinse, and hang to dry.

Soften brushes

Photo: Yuri Maksymiv (Shutterstock)

Photo: Yuri Maksymiv (Shutterstock)

For soft paint and makeup brushes, use a tiny bit of conditioner after washing them as you normally would. Work it in before hanging them out to dry and your brushes will be ready to blend, buff and embellish in no time, according to a Redditor who recommends it.

Prevent rust

Photo: BJ.Photo (Shutterstock)

Photo: BJ.Photo (Shutterstock)

Reader’s Digest Canada suggests using a conditioner to prevent rust from forming on your tools. Rub your wrenches and their toolbox mates with a small amount of conditioner every once in a while to keep them shiny.

Remove stuck rings

Photo: Albina Gavrilovic (Shutterstock)

Photo: Albina Gavrilovic (Shutterstock)

There are many ways to remove a stuck ring. At Lifehacker, we recommended using rubber bands, Windex, and dental floss. However, I always use conditioner because its watery yet slippery texture is easier to manage than petroleum jelly, lotion, or soap.

DIY drying sheets

Photo: VGstockstudio (Shutterstock)

Photo: VGstockstudio (Shutterstock)

According to The Spruce, you can use conditioner to make dryer sheets, which paves the way for a bunch of new scents. Fill a spray bottle with equal parts water and conditioner, shake it up, and spray it on a washcloth when laundry day arrives. Toss the cloth in your machine as you would any fabric softener sheet.

Polish stainless steel

Photo: OpatSuvi (Shutterstock)

Photo: OpatSuvi (Shutterstock)

This tip also comes from The Spruce: Dab some conditioner on a clean cloth and use it to buff out stains from your stainless steel appliances. Wipe with a clean cloth to remove excess and you will notice a major shine improvement.

Unclog your drains

Photo: sasimoto (Shutterstock)

Photo: sasimoto (Shutterstock)

Conditioner acts as a lubricant, especially on hair, so if you have a buildup of hair (or anything else) in your drain, pour some conditioner on the grate, leave it on for about 20 minutes and wash it off with lukewarm water. . This should help reduce blocking, according to blogger The Krazy Coupon Lady.

Attach zippers and hinges

Photo: Chester Hoth (Shutterstock)

Photo: Chester Hoth (Shutterstock)

The hinges squeak or become sticky. Zippers get stuck. Conditioner can help get your metal parts moving smoothly again, per Buzzfeed. The next time your door is noisy or your child is trapped in their winter coat, add some conditioner where the offending metals meet and slowly handle the parts that move (or are meant to move). ) back and forth to spread it out.

Toning hair

Photo: Dmytro Flisak (Shutterstock)

Photo: Dmytro Flisak (Shutterstock)

This is a bonus tip I use myself: you can extend the time between professional toning or frosting appointments by making a DIY hair mask out of white conditioner and hair dye by a step. Since I’m blonde and go for cool tones in my hair, I use a small amount of purple hair dye about the size of a pea in about three cups of white conditioner. I mix until I have a very—very– pale lilac paste, then apply it on my hair, wrap everything in a plastic bag and let it sit for about 20 minutes. Use a very small amount of dye and don’t let it sit too long, but it will have a nice toning effect, if done correctly.

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